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The Anomalist



December 10

UFO-related themes old and new figure in today's news. First, Nick Redfern relays some of the decades-long speculation about two secret US government installations. Jocelyne LeBlanc says that a Navy Officer Recalls Seeing Two-Mile-Wide UFO Over Military Base. LeBlanc also links to Mike and Maurice's Mind Escape podcast where "buddy and friend of the show Lee Adams" talk about his "flying trash bag" sighting. George Knapp (surprise!) says that Skinwalker Ranch Stories Continue to Baffle Investigators. George suggests the current ownership of the ranch "may soon be revealed" and links to a substantial Colorado article about the fabled site. Alas, the map associated with that article shows a location in China, last we looked. And, love him or not, UFO Stories are Familiar Territory for Tucker Carlson. George describes an interview by British ufologist Nick Pope of Carlson, and George also notes the interviews Carlson has recently done of people related to the Big Story. Pope has a good tweet about keeping politics and UFOs separate. (WM)

Are you hype yet? No. We will make you hype, famiglia. For example, Rob Schwarz caught the trailer for Ghostbusters: Afterlife and gives an overview for those of you on dialup who really can't watch YouTube like everyone else in the 21st century. After that, Rob has a few interesting tangents. And leave it to John E.L. Tenney to talk about how the New Ghostbusters Is Just Another Old Ghost Breaker. If you  never understood why he wears suits and suspenders (braces for the Brits), he gets his vintage on drawing parallels between two spooky oldies from the early 20th century and why they're just as relevant in the new century. Behind the screens, Charlie Hintz reminds everyone Ghostbusters Star Dan Aykroyd's Roots In Real Life Ghost Hunting. It's not his quest to contact John Belushi, but rather his family's trade fussing around with séances, spooks, and spiritualism. (CS)

Seems like there's always something paranormally interesting in Russia, like a recently released video that evidently depicts a female Bigfoot chasing a car and its terrified passengers down a road. Follow that with Russian Running Bigfoot Video Update – "They hit the Yeti!" . So it was an angry Bigfoot and authorities are claiming it--She--left DNA behind on the vehicle. None of the videos are available for viewing on Youtube anymore, so it's anyone's guess what really happened. Maybe the manufacturers of the Lada were hoping for a enough publicity to merit a re-launch. Update: Tim Binnall has the video: Watch: Bigfoot Chases Car in Russia?(CM)

Hiatus Inexplicata
Inexplicata, the website of The Institute of Hispanic Ufology, is going on what is at least a temporary hiatus, according to its Founder and Editor Scott Corrales. Henceforth Inexplicata's Facebook page will cover lower-interest events, and Scott says he will continue to report "any truly major piece of information" on his website. Inexplicata has filled an important niche in ufological communications, providing to the English-speaking world current and past developments in the Spanish-speaking UFO world. Of particular sadness is the "most compelling" reason for Scott stepping away from his invaluable task. We send Scott and his wife best wishes, prayers, and thanks. (WM)

December 9

The Big UFO Story that broke on December 2017 has taken yet another turn--or more. Paul Seaburn says that a Pentagon spokesperson has contradicted a Pentagon spokesperson "who was repeating the information that had been provided by a previous spokesperson some two years earlier." If that's confusing, it may have been meant to be. In any event, Paul sets the matter out as straight as it probably can be, and links to John Greenewald Jr's The Pentagon Corrects Record on "Secret UFO Program" for more information. This latest Pentagon communication directly challenges several claims made by To The Stars...Academy of Arts & Science (TTSA) officer Luis Elizondo about the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program and his role within it. Stay tuned. But there is no doubt that the Navy has been recording things it says it cannot explain, and Danny Silva says of one F/A-18 pilot and one key figure in the AATIP program Lt. Graves & Robert Bigelow Allude to Continuing UFO Events. Silva also quotes Christopher Mellon, another TTSA officer, in support of his point. In yet another wrinkle to the constantly ramifying overall story, Billy Cox adds further on the matter of the explosive notes supposedly written by physicist Eric Davis, who works for another TTSA officer, Hal Puthoff. 'I Don't Recall' Admiral Wilson explains this conundrum and Billy's frustrated efforts to gain some clarity about it. (WM)

Back in 1950 Enrico Fermi asked, "Where is everyone?" which kicked off the search for extraterrestrial life as we know it. While Kesh Anand may not be a household name 69 years in Fermi's future, The Anomalist is pretty certain he's already notorious somewhere up the timeline. There's no need for treknobabble nor inscrutably dense rhetoric here, as Kesh's five provocative proposals herald yet another grand search. (CS)

Four posts reflecting aspects of the UFO/human dynamic. Spanish researcher Jose Antonio Caravaca seeks in this first article and subsequent comments to explain further the complex interaction between witnesses and an "external agent" operating without an overall plan. The result of this collaboration is a close encounter report, sometimes complete with physical traces. With A UFO Report or a 2014 Psychiatric Case-report? Rich Reynolds offers a remarkable anomalous account and asks readers for a verdict. Then Folie a Deux and UFO Reports indicates how poorly understood the psychological condition itself actually is. Rich accepts one famous UFO case as an example of this dual error, and doesn't believe another iconic CE4 is a "folie a deux event." And with My one UFO sighting that got news coverage Rich satisfies a number of us who wondered about that interesting sighting of his (and lots of other Michiganders) which likely would not have fit in Helene Deutsch's mass phenomenon category. (WM)

It's looking like a merry, hairy Christmas in Witchita, Kansas, and we couldn't be more thrilled for its citizens. Their official yuletide spokesperson is Brian, a statuesque and highly personable Bigfoot who never throws rocks and loves spreading the holiday spirit. Bless Us Everyone, especially those with more body hair than the rest. And if you're looking for the perfect gift for the intelligent, thoughtful Bigfoot fan in your life, check out this review of a book entitled, The Noble Beyond. Initially intended as an article, the journey of Toronto journalist John Zada through the Big Bear Rainforest of British Columbia became a story of epic proportions. If you want to learn about other Squatchy adventures, you'll enjoy reading ‘Expedition Bigfoot’s’ Bryce Johnson and Russell Acord: The Horror News Network Interview . (CM)

December 8

Does Earth have another target for our attempts to reach out and touch someone, or might this be natural phenomenon conflated to "you-know-who"? Sequoyah Kennedy knows the score and wants to bring you up to speed. If they do answer, perhaps there'll be an answer to the age old question, "How Do Aliens Have Sex?" Is it a series of ovipositors and hectocotyli, or something far more disgusting yet erotic? Drawing upon our oeuvre of extraterrestrial por... science fiction, and our understanding of how our weird critters do the nasty, finds Mark Hay may have a clue. For those of you fetishizing little green men and their probes, you'll be disappointed to learn a Physicist Has Theory As To Why We Haven't Met Aliens Yet, And It's Pretty Depressing because we would be to blame. Which is why Rob Schwarz doesn't surprise us with his declaration, "Alien Observers Might Use Tiny Interstellar Space Probes to protect themselves from us filthy, hairless monkeys who will have sex with just about anything regardless of the status of its heartbeat. Plus this hypothesis presents a keen explanation as to why they haven't been spotted as of yet. (CS)

More than half a decade ago, Hugh Everett and his theories couldn't get spit on if he was on fire. Nowadays, probably thanks to Philip K. Dick and other weirdos, the idea of many worlds is suddenly rational and acceptable even to grayfaces. Cory Powell explains the mechanics, and the potential, of parallel universes and how they've emerged from the shadow of woo. Not weird enough for ya? Perhaps we can entice you with Frightening Experiences With Spiritual Attachments? Did we mention it's from Brent Swancer? Sadly it's not about lovelorn spooks who don't, or won't, get the hint, but regarding the fetters chaining them to this mortal coil, seemingly for eternity. Still lost? Perhaps you'll find The Politics Of High Strangeness with Erik Davis and RU Sirius to be your cuppa? We just won't tell you if they invoke the "T" word or not. (CS)

December 7

Everyone has conspiracy theories, but are they as nuts as their believers? A survey of reddit's conspiracy subreddit illustrates holding outlandish beliefs isn't so nutty. Everyone trips down a rabbit hole, now and again, but it's where they end up is where madness lay. Take Alex Tsakiris, who tripped down the deepest rabbit hole known to humanity in recent memory, and now he finds himself talking to diverse personalities concerning high strangeness and consciousness. Like Lance Mungia who bends Alex's ear to espouse his findings concerning Third Eye Spies And What's Behind Remote Viewing Disclosure in a wide-ranging and engaging conversation. (CS)

Cats In The Paranormal Association Of Paranormal Study
Cats. Despite centuries of denigration and dodging kicks, they remain an obsession for humanity which has been magnified by the advent of the internet. Why the love/hate relationship? It comes down to the myths, legendry, and beliefs surrounding their quiet, noble presences as Alex Matsuo outlines in his Saturday morning essay. If you don't understand cats, Hannah Sparks wants you to know Cats Are Trying To Talk To You With Their Faces. All those meows and whines are to draw your monkey-attetion to their faces which convey more than words. Let's not forget about Canine Exceptionalism. Jessica Hekman gets down to brass tacks as to why humans tolerate, and desire, the company of dogs. Science loves to put limits on what an average dog can accomplish, but more often than not dogs will surprise us by breaking conventions. For example, Stanley Coren investigates the curious question of "Can Dogs Smell Time?" The uncanny knack for dogs to "know" when someone's coming home may have a startlingly simple explanation which is bearing out in scientific studies. See for yourself. On the other hand, there's a reason why dogs charm us. They have a capacity to not be very bright. Ewan Palmer recounts them time a Dog Left Alone Accidentally Turns on Microwave, Nearly Burning Down Their Home. (CS)

Can Dreams Predict Death? Psychology Today
It's important to keep track of your dreams. Eric Wargo recommends it at The Nightshirt and in Time Loops, and now Sharon Hewitt Rawelette's joining the bandwagon for dreams which predict death. And it all boils down to Dr. Andrew Paquette's pioneering, and skeptical, inquiry into the phenomenon. As for other wild talents, Tristan Shaw recalls the time A Nobleman (Partially) Solved the Disappearance Of A Purloined Plate. Was it all a dream, or did the ghost of a murdered servant help crack the case? Still skeptical? Allow Michael Grosso to open your third eye to the truth behind The Teleportation Of Mrs. Guppy. Quite possibly the only time a séance has ever summoned a live person. (CS)

December 6

With ReactiveQ CEO Deep Prasad's permission, Jazz Shaw republishes a Thanksgiving Twitter thread recounting a flat-out astonishing experience Prasad had on February 1st of this year. Whatever one makes of it, we marvel at the courage this man has to put the account on record. It certainly makes for fascinating reading, and conjures up a variety of possible takeaways. Nick Redfern gives us two articles on a contact mode of ancillary interest to ufology, beginning with are Men in Black: Demonically Possessed and Controlled? Nick follows up on this exceedingly weird and scary question with a consideration of Black Eyed Children, Occultists & Demonologists. Nick's doing a research project on these topics that is heading towards some disquieting conclusions. Maybe we need to end with a lighter look at personal encounters with unknown entities, and for that we turn to Popular Mechanics and Eric Spitznagel's Aliens Smell Like Farts. This is more than a joke about ET flatulence; it's science looking at an understudied aspect of possible human/alien contact. (WM)

The title subject takes up most of the November 2019 issue of The SAA Archaeological Record. Since its parent organization's focus is on American archaeology, Graham Hancock is decidedly the most successful purveyor of "alternate archaeology," and especially because Hancock's most recent effort America Before is American in focus, that new tome takes a lot of "hits" from the traditional archaeological establishment. Article authors cite weaknesses in Hancock's employment of new genetic discoveries and the premature and likely incorrect use of the "Cerutti Mastodon" as support for a 100,000-year addition to the residency of humans in the Americas. Throughout, writers claim Hancock's attacks on their bastions are misplaced. They correctly decry how basic premises behind pseudoarchaeology have been used since the European march westward in North America to denigrate First Peoples and underpin the white nationalism that has become so blatant of late. A closer reading of the articles and other sections of the magazine highlights systemic problems in modern archaeology. For one thing, while Hancock is acknowledged several times to be a master storyteller, much traditional scholarship is not aimed at the general public and is frankly dull. Editors and authors also directly engage the field's sexual harassment issue. A clear takeaway is that these people are trying mightily to inject relevance into the discipline. Archaeologists must descend from their ivory towers; they must speak to the general public, explaining their views in a more comprehensible manner. And they owe it to the rest of us actively to contribute insights they have gained from their studies of the past to pressing current issues, such as resource management and ethnic sensitivity. (WM)

Here are four anomalous situations that get progressively stranger and more difficult to explain. With this first oddity, there's a simple answer for a fairly unusual event. Having given us that, Tim Binnall moves us up a bit on the weird scale with an Odd UFO Filmed in South Carolina. It's an intriguing juxtaposition of objects, but while no authoritative proclamations have occurred, nothing here really bends the mind. But we cross a line of sorts with The Strange Mystery of the Eltanin Antenna. Brent Swancer tells the history of this mystery, and its most likely solution. The "Antenna" could certainly be a new species of sponge, but its apparent "regularity" initially boggles the mind, like basalt columns or Fibonacci spirals in Nautilus shells to hurricanes and galaxies. Brent then takes us far into the inscrutable with A Bizarre UFO Attack in the Korean War. No images here, but a single-witness-only story of wartime horror from a very unexpected quarter. Attempts at independent confirmation apparently have been unsuccessful, though the "Easy" Company commander's last name is known. There are several possible explanations for this account, none of them truly satisfying. (WM)

December 5

For those of us who were unsuccessful--or didn't participate--in the Sotheby auction on December 3rd of Billy Meier photographs, BBC News has pics and brief commentary. Kevin Randle has A Different Perspective on Glenn Dennis and the Interview on YouTube. He's unhappy with the YouTube claims behind the interview, and most of the assertions made within the interview itself. Jason Colavito accords two stars in his Review of "Gods, Man, & War 2: Man" by Tom DeLonge with Peter Levenda. Given what Jason says about and quotes from the book, the consistent identifications with the rest of the To The Stars...Academy of Arts & Science organization makes one wince. It's therefore good to hear from Rich Reynolds about Paul Kimball's Book, The Other Side of Truth--Free, as a PDF Download. This volume doesn't lend itself to pigeonholing; but whatever one's UFO stripe, they should find it a fun personal romp through the paranormal--and other things--with some thought-worthy insights, too. (WM)

Rare Ectoplasm Photos Third Millennium Spirituality
Ectoplasm may be the strangest of all high strangeness phenomena. Presented here are ectoplasm photographs of the Canadian medium Leonard Stott, taken in 1946. In one rarely seen snap, both a spirit hand and a floating trumpet materialize. Medium Kai Muegge presents other materialized spirit hand photographs from other mediums in this post. Over at Carlos Alvarado's blog, a summary appears of an article in the Journal of Parapsychology on The Mediumship of Jane Roberts, the woman who channeled the purported discarnate entity called Seth. Roberts’ mediumship has generally been overlooked by the parapsychological research community, which Paul Cunningham tries to redress in this article. He writes: "The challenge for psychology is to explain how Jane Roberts . . . could suddenly possess, in full-blown fashion with no apparent previous study or instruction and no gradual development, an ability to compose internally coherent philosophical, psychological, spiritual, and ethical material of a very high order of originality, conceptual sophistication, and intellectual rigor in long complex narratives..." (PH)

The Dark Vision of Don Worley Hakan Blomqvist's Blog
Hakan Blomqvist tells a balanced story about a ufologist whose core views in some ways sharply varied with his own. The result: a revealing example of the results from differing approaches to a problem uncomfortable for many ufologists. Don Worley (1921- 2018) and John Keel (1930-2009), says Hakan, dealt in many of the same UFO-peripheral areas and "in a certain sense they also arrived at similar conclusions regarding the intelligences behind the phenomena." John Keel site manager Doug Skinner offers some Correspondence with Joseph Wershba. "I am not a ufo-nut, but am a comedy writer gone wrong" is one of the lighter moments in a fairly angry missive to the writer/producer of CBS' 1966 program UFO: Friend, Foe, or Fantasy? Keel's claim to be "in possession of the full facts" and touting his upcoming 30,000-word article in Playboy sound a little hollow now. A Letter from June Larson, May 30, 1966 furnishes an interesting contrast. Larson adopts a moderate approach regarding John's feeling inundated by her news clippings, as well as John's animus towards NICAP's role in "this confused and somewhat 'off-beat' subject." (WM)

December 4

Jack Brewer continues to try to tease out facts about the rather amazing and mysterious character Don Davis Flickinger. (As an aside, we looked up the Brigadier General's USAF biography at Brigadier General Don D. Flickinger. Besides the August 1, 1961, date of retirement and February 23, 1997, date of mortality, the bio seems truncated and is shown rather strangely as "(Up to date as of May 1956)." Brewer's article is actually a status report on his efforts to gather information on Flickinger's relationships with three Russians in 1969. These attempts support Brewer's general theme that "When intelligence professionals are involved in the UFO fray, it seems a safe bet we will find espionage and counterespionage operations not too far removed." The Flickinger-UFO connection first came through the work of Keith Basterfield, as Jack explains. With Cold War Embassy Games Brewer elaborates upon some of the eye-opening background involving various intelligence communities' hijinks. (WM)

Smell and the Singapore Theory Living Life in Full Spectrum
"Smell is extremely powerful," and there's certainly a lot in today's world that stinks, but according to this piece odors are perhaps strong enough to summon the interest of the spirit world, if we are prepared "to be creative." And if you want to think about the paranormal In the words of Peter Underwood, noted writer on the subject, then this round-up of his sensible musings might be just the thing to get you going. Example: “98% of reported hauntings have a natural and mundane explanation … it is the other 2% that have interested me for over 40 years.” (LP)

The ancient past often foreshadows present situations. Such is the case with the Sumerian god Ea, according to Dr. Martin Worthington's new book. Paul Seaburn summarizes the press release which devotes itself entirely to this aspect of Ea's Duplicity in the Gilgamesh Flood Story. Worthington's argument seems persuasive, but there's just got to be more on Ea/Enki/Nudimmud/Ninsiku and his double-dealing in the 522-page tome than the presser discusses. You can find out for yourself for a cool $123.72; even the Kindle version is almost $40. Paul also reports that a Mystery Religion at Lake Titicaca Pre-Dated The Incas by 500 Years. Paul explains how in terms of "research and publicity" the Incas have all the good luck specifically because of their bad luck. He also reiterates a general point regarding the pre-Columbian history of the New World. Here he emphasizes how artifacts from the earlier Tiwanaku culture "will help historians not rewrite history but write the true history of the pre-Columbian cultures of South America." (WM)


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